Author of Drive On: The Uncensored War of Bedouin Bob and the All-Americans, Bob Dvorchak

Author of Drive On: The Uncensored War of Bedouin Bob and the All-Americans, Bob Dvorchak

 

Veterans Tribute and War Correspondent, Bob Dvorchak

Veterans Tribute and War Correspondent, Bob Dvorchak

Today, Tuesday, June 27th is National Post-Traumatic Stress Injury Awareness Day and today happens to be a gathering of BiPartisan Members of Congress for the 6th Annual Tribute to Veterans and Those Who Serve. A gathering to honor our Veterans this Independence Holiday. Highlighted here is my client, Author and War Correspondent, Bob Dvorchak’s interview with Breitbart’s own Curt Schilling, Whatever It Takes speaking about the Veterans Accountability act, the invisible wounds of war and the tribute to members of congress who have served our nation.

Bob Dvorchak is a veteran and war correspondent who served with the 82nd Airborne. His most recent book Drive On: The Uncensored War of Bedouin Bob and the All-AmericansThe Drive On Book Tour will be featured my Mission BBQ in Philadelphia PA this Independence Weekend. 

War Correspondent and Author of Drive On Book Tour Coming to Eastern North Carolina

War Correspondent and Author of Drive On Book Tour Coming to Eastern North Carolina

Bob Dvorchak, Author of Drive On The Uncensored War of Bedouin Bob and the All-Americans describes his account as a war reporter with the 82nd Airborne during Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) —  Veteran, Former AP War Correspondent, and Author Bob Dvorchak says the soldiers of the 82nd airborne gave him and unfettered look at what it was like to be dug in and waiting for Operation Desert Storm to begin.

His new book, “Drive On: The Uncensored War of Bedouin Bob and the All-Americans” gives a raw and personal perspective of what it is like to go through a war.  Dvorchak, nicknamed ‘Bedouin Bob’ by soldiers, describes in detail what they endured, how they lived, and what they were feeling in the days just before the battle began.

His personal journal of his time is a look at all who participated, the hardships they suferred and their reminders of home and family.

Dvorchak will be signing books at Barnes & Noble in Jacksonville Saturday from noon until four.

 

Valentine’s Day – Love a Veteran

Valentine’s Day – Love a Veteran

VetREST Valentine’s Day Edition

Our Veterans pay a high price for their service.  Today, our nation, has suffered great loss with 20 veterans a day committing suicide.

Support #VetREST this #ValentinesDay by donating to our coach program. Our coaches are trained and certified to come alongside hurting vets and help them first identify the cause of their #PTS and then establish an effective four-fold strategy to move towards recovery. #IHeartVeterans #HeartAVeteran

This #ValentinesDay#WearYourHeartOnYourSleeve #HeartAVet and donate to #VetREST.

Aside from the cost of separation from family and their homes, they carry the memories of survival… carrying a heavy toll. #LoveourVeterans www.vetrest.org

 

 

Take a Moment to Thank Our Nation’s Veterans

Take a Moment to Thank Our Nation’s Veterans

“Let me also say that America is grateful to the hundreds of Vietnam veterans who, when I asked them to join my administration, did so, and have and are serving our nation so proudly. For your devotion to America, I salute you.

We’re gathered today, just as we have gathered before, to remember those who served, those who fought, those still missing, and those who gave their last full measure of devotion for our country. We’re gathered at a monument on which the names of our fallen friends and loved ones are engraved, and with crosses instead of diamonds beside them, the names of those whose fate we do not yet know. One of those who fell wrote, shortly before his death, these words: “Take what they have left and what they have taught you with their dying and keep it with your own. And take one moment to embrace those gentle heroes you left behind.”

Well, today, Veterans Day, as we do every year, we take that moment to embrace the gentle heroes of Vietnam and of all our wars. We remember those who were called upon to give all a person can give, and we remember those who were prepared to make that sacrifice if it were demanded of them in the line of duty, though it never was. Most of all, we remember the devotion and gallantry with which all of them ennobled their nation as they became champions of a noble cause.

I’m not speaking provocatively here. Unlike the other wars of this century, of course, there were deep divisions about the wisdom and rightness of the Vietnam war. Both sides spoke with honesty and fervor. And what more can we ask in our democracy? And yet after more than a decade of desperate boat people, after the killing fields of Cambodia, after all that has happened in that unhappy part of the world, who can doubt that the cause for which our men fought was just? It was, after all, however imperfectly pursued, the cause of freedom; and they showed uncommon courage in its service. Perhaps at this late date we can all agree that we’ve learned one lesson: that young Americans must never again be sent to fight and die unless we are prepared to let them win.

But beyond that, we remember today that all our gentle heroes of Vietnam have given us a lesson in something more: a lesson in living love. Yes, for all of them, those who came back and those who did not, their love for their families lives. Their love for their buddies on the battlefields and friends back home lives. Their love of their country lives.

This memorial has become a monument to that living love. The thousands who come to see the names testify to a love that endures. The messages and mementos they leave speak with a whispering voice that passes gently through the surrounding trees and out across the breast of our peaceful nation. A childhood teddy bear, a photograph of the son or daughter born too late to know his or her father, a battle ribbon, a note—there are so many of these, and all are testimony to our living love for them. And our nation itself is testimony to the love our veterans have had for it and for us. Our liberties, our values, all for which America stands is safe today because brave men and women have been ready to face the fire at freedom’s front. And we thank God for them.

Yes, gentle heroes and living love and our memories of a time when we faced great divisions here at home. And yet if this place recalls all this, both sweet and sad, it also reminds us of a great and profound truth about our nation: that from all our divisions we have always eventually emerged strengthened. Perhaps we are finding that new strength today, and if so, much of it comes from the forgiveness and healing love that our Vietnam veterans have shown.

For too long a time, they stood in a chill wind, as if on a winter night’s watch. And in that night, their deeds spoke to us, but we knew them not. And their voices called to us, but we heard them not. Yet in this land that God has blessed, the dawn always at last follows the dark, and now morning has come. The night is over. We see these men and know them once again—and know how much we owe them, how much they have given us, and how much we can never fully repay. And not just as individuals but as a nation, we say we love you.” – President Ronald Reagan – November 11, 1988 – Veterans Day Ceremony